Pop Goes the Grrrl: Commencement by J. Courtney Sullivan

So, 3 years ago, I set up a blog to crit/discuss/review/whatever pop culture stuff I consume through a feminist lens. I finally wrote something on it for the first time tonight. It’s not good, but it’s just stretching my thinking/writing muscles before I tackle something else. 

popgoesthegrrrl:

I just started Spring Break this week, and I’ve been looking forward to spending the week catching up on reading. I set my goal this year as 50 books, and while I think it’s attainable, Goodreads tells me I’m 8 books behind where I need to be. That’s ok, because I make up for it when I overdose…

garconniere:

jeanthesecond:

We are all caught up in one another, Scott Lauria Morgensen asserts, we who live in settler societies, and our interrelationships inform all that these societies touch. Native people live in relation to all non-Natives amid the ongoing power relations of settler colonialism, despite never losing inherent claims to sovereignty as indigenous peoples. Explaining how relational distinctions of “Native” and “settler” define the status of being “queer,” Spaces between Us argues that modern queer subjects emerged among Natives and non-Natives by engaging the meaningful difference indigeneity makes within a settler society.
Morgensen’s analysis exposes white settler colonialism as a primary condition for the development of modern queer politics in the United States. Bringing together historical and ethnographic cases, he shows how U.S. queer projects became non-Native and normatively white by comparatively examining the historical activism and critical theory of Native queer and Two-Spirit people.
Presenting a “biopolitics of settler colonialism”—in which the imagined disappearance of indigeneity and sustained subjugation of all racialized peoples ensures a progressive future for white settlers—Spaces between Us newly demonstrates the interdependence of nation, race, gender, and sexuality and offers opportunities for resistance in the United States.
(via Spaces between Us — University of Minnesota Press) via curate
!

 HOLY SHIT this looks so, so, so good. birthday present, please?

This looks amazing. I’m going to request it at the library, but I don’t hold high hopes they’ll have/get it.

garconniere:

jeanthesecond:

We are all caught up in one another, Scott Lauria Morgensen asserts, we who live in settler societies, and our interrelationships inform all that these societies touch. Native people live in relation to all non-Natives amid the ongoing power relations of settler colonialism, despite never losing inherent claims to sovereignty as indigenous peoples. Explaining how relational distinctions of “Native” and “settler” define the status of being “queer,” Spaces between Us argues that modern queer subjects emerged among Natives and non-Natives by engaging the meaningful difference indigeneity makes within a settler society.

Morgensen’s analysis exposes white settler colonialism as a primary condition for the development of modern queer politics in the United States. Bringing together historical and ethnographic cases, he shows how U.S. queer projects became non-Native and normatively white by comparatively examining the historical activism and critical theory of Native queer and Two-Spirit people.

Presenting a “biopolitics of settler colonialism”—in which the imagined disappearance of indigeneity and sustained subjugation of all racialized peoples ensures a progressive future for white settlers—Spaces between Us newly demonstrates the interdependence of nation, race, gender, and sexuality and offers opportunities for resistance in the United States.

(via Spaces between Us — University of Minnesota Press) via curate

!

 HOLY SHIT this looks so, so, so good. birthday present, please?

This looks amazing. I’m going to request it at the library, but I don’t hold high hopes they’ll have/get it.

julieklausner:


I would venture to say that today’s muse doesn’t get any respect. Instead, she’s regarded as little more than a  “groupie.”
But how relevant is the concept nowadays? (The fashion world is an exception, where design houses often feature a “muse.”) Women can be artists themselves, and not live the creative life vicariously.
Which is exactly what Klausner discovered through her misadventures  in dating creative types. She realized that she didn’t actually care  about their bands or their looks or their cultural status in their  trendy Brooklyn music scenes. She was jealous. She was being creative  only by association. And she hated herself for it.
That called for a change in attitude, and a rejection of the  traditional role of the muse. As Klausner concludes: “You’re not the  accessory to his journey, you’re the hero in yours.”

CBC Books: Julie Klausner: Writer, performer…Anti-Muse

I know  I’ve said this like a million times, but this was probably my favorite book last year. I haven’t laughed that much in a looooong time. Super excited for it to be turned into a tv series.

julieklausner:

I would venture to say that today’s muse doesn’t get any respect. Instead, she’s regarded as little more than a “groupie.”

But how relevant is the concept nowadays? (The fashion world is an exception, where design houses often feature a “muse.”) Women can be artists themselves, and not live the creative life vicariously.

Which is exactly what Klausner discovered through her misadventures in dating creative types. She realized that she didn’t actually care about their bands or their looks or their cultural status in their trendy Brooklyn music scenes. She was jealous. She was being creative only by association. And she hated herself for it.

That called for a change in attitude, and a rejection of the traditional role of the muse. As Klausner concludes: “You’re not the accessory to his journey, you’re the hero in yours.”

CBC Books: Julie Klausner: Writer, performer…Anti-Muse

I know  I’ve said this like a million times, but this was probably my favorite book last year. I haven’t laughed that much in a looooong time. Super excited for it to be turned into a tv series.

TV free Monday was (again) a fail. Whoops.
(via postsecret)

TV free Monday was (again) a fail. Whoops.

(via postsecret)